Use iptables with CentOS 7

  • Last updated on: 2019-01-16
  • Authored by: Shaun Crumpler

Beginning with Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® (RHEL) 7 and CentOS® 7, firewalld is available for managing iptables. As a result, you either need to use firewall-cmd commands, or disable firewalld and enable iptables. This article shows you how to use the classic iptables setup.

Stop and mask the firewalld service

Run the following commands to stop and mask the firewalld service that you don’t want to use:

$ systemctl stop firewalld
$ systemctl mask firewalld

Install and configure iptables

Use the following steps to install and configure iptables:

  1. Install the iptables-services package (if it is not already installed) by running the following command:

    $ yum install iptables-services
    
  2. Enable the service to start at boot time by running the following commands:

    $ systemctl enable iptables
    $ systemctl enable ip6tables
    
  3. Next, add iptables rules. You can do this in either of the following ways:

    • From the command-line interface (CLI), by running commands similar to iptables -I INPUT ...
    • By creating or editing your /etc/sysconfig/iptables file to look similar to the following basic example, which leaves ports 22 and 80 open:

      $ cat /etc/sysconfig/iptables
      *filter
      :INPUT ACCEPT [0:0]
      :FORWARD ACCEPT [0:0]
      :OUTPUT ACCEPT [214:43782]
      -A INPUT -m state --state RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT
      -A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 80 -j ACCEPT
      -A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 22 -j ACCEPT
      -A INPUT -i lo -j ACCEPT
      -A INPUT -j REJECT --reject-with icmp-port-unreachable
      COMMIT
      
      $cat /etc/sysconfig/ip6tables
      
      *filter
      :INPUT ACCEPT [0:0]
      :FORWARD ACCEPT [0:0]
      :OUTPUT ACCEPT [214:43782]
      -A INPUT -m state --state RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT
      -A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 80 -j ACCEPT
      -A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 22 -j ACCEPT
      -A INPUT -i lo -j ACCEPT
      -A INPUT -j REJECT --reject-with icmp6-adm-prohibited
      COMMIT
      
  4. (Optional) If you are saving your rules in the /etc/sysconfig/ip{,6}tables files, you must also run the following commands:

    $ systemctl restart iptables
    $ systemctl restart ip6tables
    
  5. Next, check that the iptables service is active by running the following commands:

    $ systemctl status iptables
    $ systemctl status ip6tables
    
  6. Check your iptables rules by running the following commands:

    $ iptables -L
    $ ip6tables -L
    
  7. Verify that your server is listening on the ports that you opened (22 and 80 in the above example) by running the following command:

    $ netstat -plant
    
  8. Query the systemd journal for a log of the changes that you made to the iptables service by running the following commands:

    $ journalctl -f -u iptables.service
    $ journalctl -f -u ip6tables.service
    
  9. Reboot the server. The iptables rules should be saved and automatically reloaded.

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